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I LOVE chocolate but I’m not really sure I’d be able to eat these. They’re way too beautiful! Edible Surfaces is a collaboration between Pinaki Studios, a London-based creative textile studio, and Chocolátl, a retail shop and tasting space in Amsterdam, that specialises in eclectic premium chocolate. The joint venture draws inspiration from the processes of chocolate artisans and textile manipulations such as pleating, creasing and embossing. It investigates parallels in the technical methods of those crafts, as well as inventive concepts for the development of edible objects.

Pinaki Studios and Chocolátl presented Edible Surfaces to coincide with Dutch Design Week, which ran last month.

(via COVER Blog)

I am so drawn to these abstract works by artist, Michelle Armas. Her beautifully colourful canvases pop up on Pinterest regularly and I fall in love every time. Anthropologie is a fan too. She started painting after her corporate branding career lead to chronic health problems that practically crippled her ability to get out of bed. She was eventually diagnosed with adrenal fatigue and through a therapeutic form of Thai Chi, found her way back to health and ultimately, a new career. It is evident in this Design*Sponge interview that she, and her new business, are thriving.

Oslo-based artist, Henrik Aarrestad Uldalen‘s oil paintings caught my eye. He explores the metaphysical, his subjects floating in space as if lost in limbo. Or maybe they’re in a dream state. However you interpret them, they’re pretty awesome. Although the self-taught Uldalen says hyperrealism is not what he’s after, I have to say, the photorealism is pretty impressive. I had to do a double take.

I am blown away by Shannon Rankin‘s map installations. How great are these? I love artists that repurpose things to create new narrative. Although in this case, her intricately patterned installations are so perfectly constructed, they probably appeal to my OCD. The Maine-based artist creates installations, collages, and drawings that use the language of maps to explore the connections among geological and biological processes, patterns in nature, geometry and anatomy.

(via The Jealous Curator)

I bet you’re thinking these are pretty stunning photos, right? Well they’re not. Photos that is. These are Marilyn Minter’s incredible, hyper-realistic paintings. That’s right, paintings! I saw her work over on The Artful Desperado and was taken aback.

Minter begins her process by staging photo shoots with film. She uses a conventional darkroom processes and does’t crop or digitally manipulate her photographs. Her paintings, on the other hand, are made by combining negatives in photoshop to make a whole new image. This new image is then turned into paintings created through the layering of enamel paint on aluminum. The last layer is applied with fingertips to create a modeling or softening of the paintbrush lines.

The 64-year-old New York-based artist’s work has been shown at an international level and not surprisingly, has garnered quite a loyal fan base.

Found photos and embroidery, what a fantastic pairing. I’ve been seeing a few different artists’ work lately, but this series, called Lonely Houses, by Hagar Vardimon-van Heummen of Amsterdam-based, Happy Red Fish, really caught my eye. The clean yet intricate and detailed collages are just so beautiful to look at. It’s as if the strands of thread are mapping the history of these buildings, and securing the memories held within them.

(via Design*Sponge)

I could stare at Dion Johnson’s idiosyncratic compositions all day. I just love how the colour interplay in the LA-based artist’s work can seem controlled and haphazard at the same time. The flat planes of intense colour rhythmically merging and moving against one another, but always contained by their hard edges. I can imagine how these vibrant, large scale canvases would completely energize a room, can’t you? For those of us who can’t live in the eternal summer of  Southern California, perhaps living with one of Johnson’s radiant canvases is the next best thing.

(via Chloé Douglas)

Wow. At just 22, Tamara Lichtenstein certainly knows how to take a photograph. The gifted Huston, Texas-based shutterbug has been taking pictures since she was a teenager, and is already quite accomplished. She has published a book of her work, and has an impressive list of clients, which include Converse, Urban Outfitters and NEON Magazine. Lichtenstein also has an Etsy shop full of her gorgeous prints and updates her Flickr photostream regularly. Which is a good thing because I can’t get enough of her beautifully pure and ultra feminine work.

 

I came across one of Brooke Wandall’s canvases over on curate1K the other day and just fell in love. The Scranton, Pensilvania- based artist makes the most beautiful abstract paintings. She says of her process, “as I take away the physical nature, I add to the conceptual nature.” Wandall also says she has to work quickly not only because she’s impatient, but because she has two small children. Well, whatever the reason, Wandall is prolific. Just check out her amazing range of works on etsy. *sigh* I wish I had the space for this Abstract Landscape… love it.

(Quote via The Magazine of Yoga.)

 

This is hands down, the most amazing wedding invitation ever. Designers Jessica Hische and Russ Maschmeyer collaborated with their talented artist friends, and created a site that puts everything else to shame.